If you haven’t already heard, MCDs are the best way to hack a language. If there were anything as powerful as it were effortless [and believe me, it is quite effortless] to learn a language with, I would like to know that way also. In the meantime however, we are now at the very crest of learning any language.

Now, for ideographic languages [any of the Chinese languages or Japanese, afaik] or languages [Arabic, Greek, Korean, etc] wherewith you do NOT yet know the very basic ruminations of the way of pronunciation, you will need to add an extra step in the listening department, but that on in another post [‘.’]

For now, I will be adding to a post by Khatzumoto from AJATT [+] referencing using MCDs to dominate Latin-Scripted [mostly European] languages.

My addition is small, but noteworthy, for, as in many of Khatz’s posts, his posts tend to come out I’m sure exactly as his thoughts come, which both is good for learning and entertainment [he’s quite the funny fellow!]. But after reading this post, I was left with a sort of, “now what?”

So, I paused my Japanese for a bit and actually started to make MCDs of French, along with some others, and here’s the kind of parts of speech I clozed out:

le, les, la, un, une, de, des, aux, ou, et, est, ser[ait], s’étaler[ont], etc…

Basically any particles, or any parts of words that change to change a nuance of meaning. Nouns, I believe, can be learned either purely through context, [I do not believe I have ever looked up “context” before ;)], or through a picture [what adjective do you think this picture represents? http://bit.ly/fvOqP ] if that is not a possibility.

Also, I have a thought that you do not need to include English on these cards because context might take care of everything!

In the end, context is KING. That is what the MCDs are all about anyway, showing you how to use parts of a language through context.

Happy Travels!

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